John and William Baldwin of Bucks county, Pennsylvania

compiled by Stewart Baldwin


The large wave of Quaker immigrants which moved from England to Pennsylvania in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries included two brothers, John Baldwin and William Baldwin, both of whom settled in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, moving there from the Pendle Forest, in Lancashire. During the same period, other Quaker immigrants named Baldwin, probably unrelated, came from other parts of England, with the result that some accounts of the genealogy of John and William Baldwin are confused or incorrect. Although direct proof of the parentage of the two brothers is still not available, their father can be identified with near certainty as John Baldwin of Wheatley in Pendle Forest, an English Quaker who died in 1719. These web pages will set out, with documentation, what is known of the two immigrant brothers and their relatives in England.

Of the two brothers, John Baldwin of Makefield township, Bucks co., PA, made his first known appearance in the records at his first marriage in England, in 1697, to Jennet Hartley. [1] The couple received a certificate to move to America in 1698, and the fact that Jennet (Hartley) Baldwin was still alive after the trip to America is proven by her presence as a witness to the 1700 marriage, in America, of Robert Heaton to Jennet’s cousin Grace Pearson, who had in turn witnessed the Baldwin-Hartley marriage in England a few years earlier (and would also witness John Baldwin’s second marriage a few years later). It would seem that Jennet (Hartley) Baldwin did not survive for long after that, and a few years later, John Baldwin married for a second time to Ann Scott, by whom he was ancestor to a large percentage of Quaker Baldwins in the midwest.

Although he had visited America earlier, William Baldwin did not come to America to stay until 1714. The fact that he had a brother named John is clear from his will, which named his brother John “Baldwen” (as the name is often spelled in the early records) as one of his executors. Since John Baldwin of Makefield township came from the same small area of Lancashire as William, and the other known Pennsylvania Quakers named John Baldwin do not make feasible candidates as brothers of William Baldwin, the identity of John Baldwin of Makefield township with William’s brother of the same name is secure.

The parentage of the brothers is more difficult to document, and direct proof of the relationship has not yet been found. However, it is almost certain that they were the sons of John Baldwin of Wheatley, in Pendle Forest, who will be called “John Baldwin Sr.”, to distinguish him from the immigrant, and whose death on 25 twelfth month [February] [2] 1718/9 was recorded by the Marsden Monthly Meeting. It is probable that their mother’s name was Bridget. The evidence for that is as follows:

While none of these pieces of evidence gives direct proof of the relationship, together they make an extremely strong case that John Baldwin Sr. was the father of the two immigrant brothers. Indeed, the words “whom he leaves alone” in William Baldwin’s removal certificate indicate that his parents lived near him (i.e., in Pendle Forest), and we would then expect them to have been members of the Marsden Monthly Meeting. Thus, the lack of any other reasonable candidates for the parents of John and William Baldwin in the Marsden records has strong weight. The parentage of John Baldwin Sr. remains unknown, and the name is too common to identify him among possible baptisms in the area without additional information. One possible clue is presented by two other Baldwin members of the Marsden Monthly Meeting who have no proven connection to John Baldwin Sr., Anthony and Margaret Baldwin, both of whom left wills. Although the possibility remains that they represent a red herring, they still need to be investigated. For an account of Anthony Baldwin and Margaret Baldwin, and transcripts of their wills, click here .


Falsely claimed parents for John Baldwin of Bucks, county Pennsylvania.

Some unpublished sources, such as the Ancestral File database, have provided John Baldwin (husband of Ann Scott) with incorrect parents, easily proven to be false. These errors have arisen from incorrect identifications with different men named John Baldwin. The two false sets of “parents” which have been offered for John Baldwin are:

Each of these couples did have a son named John, but in both cases the alleged identification of the son named John with the John Baldwin who married Ann Scott is false. In addition to the fact that the first of these couples is chronologically impossible, we can note that both of these couples were earlier immigrants to America, whose children were born in America, and therefore their sons cannot reasonably be identified with an individual who was married for the first time in England in the 1690’s. In addition to that, both of the John Baldwins who were born to the above two couples can be readily identified with other men. For the correct identification of the John Baldwins who were sons of these two couples, see Frank C. Baldwin, The Baldwins From Virginia Westward (Oak Park, IL, 1985), pp. 4, 56.


BALDWIN

JohnA Baldwin, of Wheatley in Pendle Forest, co. Lancaster, England, of unknown origin, appears for the first known time in the records of the Marsden Monthly Meeting of Friends (Quakers) in the year 1675 [3], when his residence was given as “Gisborn” (i.e., Gisburn), co. York. At that time, he was a member of the Sawley Meeting of Friends, one of the Preparative Meetings which was under the jurisdiction of the Marsden Monthly Meeting. On 29 July 1684, the constable of Rimington (in the parish of Gisburn) reported John Baldwin and his wife, along with other Quakers in the area, for being absent from church. [4] By 1693, he was said to be living at “Ing End”, [5] which has not been precisely identified, but was certainly one of the two places called “Ings End” and “Ing Ends”, both of which are small villages not far south of Gisburn. In July of 1700, he was of “Old Laund” in Pendle Forest, when his house was certified as a religious meeting place according to the recently passed Act of Toleration. [6] At the time of his death, he was of “Wheatley,” in Pendle Forest. [7] The name of John Baldwin’s wife is uncertain, but it seems likely that his wife was the same person as the Briget “Balwin” who, along with John “Balwin”, signed the certificate of removal of William “Balwin” from the Marsden Monthly Meeting to Pennsylvania on 7 1mo. [Mar.] 1713/4. [8] John Baldwin of Wheatley in Pendle Forest d. 22 bur. 15 12mo. [Feb.] 1718/9. [9]

Children of John Baldwin (order uncertain): [10]

+1. John1 Baldwin, d. 19 1mo. [Jan.] 1757, md. 1st 11 12mo. [Feb.] 1696/7, Jennet Hartley, md. 2nd 8 12mo. [Feb.] 1707/8, Ann Scott.

2. Mary Baldwin, b. 1 8mo. [Oct.] 1675, bur. 17 7mo. [Sep.] 1677.

+3. William1 Baldwin, b. 1677?, d. 29 or 30 6mo. [Aug.] 1720, md. 28 9mo. [Nov.] 1710, Mary Beakbaine.

4. Elizabeth Baldwin, b. 1 5mo. [July] 1679, d. 24 4mo. [June] 1713, md. at Marsden Height, co. Lancaster, 25 4mo. [June] 1712, James Topper of Little Marsden. The records of the Settle Monthly Meeting in Yorkshire show a marriage of James Topper of Reedley (about a mile from Little Marsden) to Elizabeth Parsons on 5 8mo. [Oct] 1716, [11] and this is possibly a second marriage for the same James Topper.

5. Mary Baldwin, b. 21 2mo. [Apr] 1687, bur. 11 11mo. [Jan.] 1693/4.


John1 Baldwin (JohnA), b. possibly in co. York, [12] England, probably either in the late 1660’s or (more likely) the early 1670’s, [13] died 19th 1mo. [Jan.] 1757. [14] At the time of his first marriage in early 1697, he was living in Wheatley, in Pendle Forest, co. Lancaster, about 7 miles south of Gisburn. He md. 1st, at the house of Roger Hartley of Oldham in Trawden Forest, co. Lancaster, 11 12mo. [Feb] 1696/7, [15] Jennet Hartley, b. 30 1mo. [Mar.] 1668, [16] daughter of Roger and Alice (Veepon) [17] Hartley of Chamber in Little Marsden, co. Lancaster. At a Preparative Meeting held at Marsden Height on 13 9mo. [Nov.] 1698, Henry Mitchel, Robert Brewer, Henry Whalley, and John Baldwen junior obtained leave to put there intentions of removing to Pennsylvania before the next Monthly Meeting. [18] Of these four men, Henry Mitchell [19] and Robert Brewer [20] are known to have come to America aboard the ship Britannia, as did many others who left for America at this time, including John Baldwin’s future second wife Ann Scott and her parents, and Jennet Baldwin’s cousin Grace Pearson (whose mother was a Veepon), a signer of John Baldwin’s marriage certificates for both his first and second marriage. Thus, it is probable that John and Jennet Baldwin were also among the passengers who came to America on the Britannia, but their actual presence on that ship has not been proven. The Britannia sailed from Liverpool, first arriving at Cork, Ireland where they took on provisions and sailed toward America before 20 3mo. [May] 1699. The voyage was a disastrous one, as a plague (probably yellow fever) broke out aboard the ship, and many of the passengers died at sea or soon after arriving in Philadelphia. The Britannia arrived in Philadelphia on 24 Aug 1699 with its sick and weak survivors. In any case, even if John and Jennet Baldwin sailed on some other ship that left at about the same time, they certainly arrived in Pennsylvania before 8 3mo. [May] 1700, on which date Jennet Baldwin signed the marriage certificate of Robert Heaton and Grace Pearson. [21] The date of death of Jennet (Hartley) Baldwin has not been discovered, but it was probably well before 7 11mo. [Jan.] 1707/8, when John Baldwin and Ann Scott first appeared before the Falls Monthly Meeting in Bucks co., PA, to declare their intention of marrying. [22] John Baldwin md. 2nd, at the Falls Meeting House in Bucks co., PA, on 12mo. [Feb.] 1707[/8], [23] Ann Scott, b. 25 6mo. [Aug.] 1688, [24] d. 9 11mo. [Jan.] 1741/2, [25] daughter of John and Jane (Bond) Scott, who had also been passengers aboard the Britannia.[26] The marriage certificate gave John Baldwin’s occupation as weaver, and listed Makefield township, Bucks co., PA as his place of residence. On 3 7mo. [Sep.] 1729, [27] John Baldwin of Makefield requested a certificate of removal to the Buckingham MM, also in Bucks co., PA, which was presented at that meeting on 2 10mo. [Dec.] 1729. [28] When the Wrightstown Monthly Meeting was split off from the Buckingham Meeting in 1734, the Baldwins were apparently among those who formed the new Monthly Meeting. Around this time, our information becomes very slim, and even the state of residence of John and Ann Baldwin during their last few years is not certain. Their son William later moved to Virginia and then North Carolina, but it is not certain whether or not William was joined by his parents. [29] Even though it has sometimes been stated that John and Ann Baldwin died in Virginia or North Carolina, there is no good evidence that they ever left Pennsylvania.

Children of John Baldwin and Ann (Scott) Baldwin: [30]

1. John Baldwin, b. 7 3mo. [May] 1716. On 4 5mo. [July] 1738, [31] a John Baldwin was brought before the Wrightstown Monthly Meeting for fighting, and this was probably the younger John, since such behavior is much more likely for a man in his twenties than one aged about sixty. Because of the common name, his later history is difficult to document. However, it seems likely that he was the same person as the John Baldwin who, on 27 August 1762, bought 660 acres of land in Rowan county, North Carolina from Granville, and then, on 19 October of the same year, with his wife Philis, sold that land to James Mendenhall. [32] On 10 7mo. [July] 1760, his wife had (as “Phelis” Baldwin) signed the marriage certificate of William Morgan and Rebeckah Mills, a certificate which had also been signed by William and Elizabeth (Morgan?) Baldwin.

2. William Baldwin, b. 20 2mo. [Apr.] 1720, d. 19 8mo. [Aug.] 1802. [33] On 5 1mo. [Mar] 1744/5, William Baldwin requested a certificate from the Wrightstown Monthly Meeting to the “Opecan” (i.e., Hopewell) Monthly Meeting in Virginia, having apparently moved to the area some time before, and this certificate was granted on 17 1mo. [Mar.] 1744/5. [34] He md.1st, Elizabeth, whose maiden name has not been proven, but who appears to have been the daughter of John and Sarah (Lloyd) Morgan of Frederick co., VA. William and Elizabeth Baldwin later became members of the New Garden Monthly Meeting in Guilford county, North Carolina, and Elizabeth d. 19 9mo. [Sep.] 1773. [35] William Baldwin then md. 2nd, New Garden MM, NC, 18 6mo. [June] 1788, [36] Mrs. Ann (Beals) Hunt, widow of Thomas Hunt, and daughter of John and Sarah (Bowater) Beals. Considerable information on the descendants of William and Elizabeth Baldwin can be found in Frank C. Baldwin, The Baldwins From Virginia Westward (Oak Park, IL, 1985), 85-103.


William1 Baldwin (JohnA), b. 1677?, [37] at Gisburn, co. York, England. [38] At the age of twenty, he became a minister of the Gospel, and visited Quaker churches throughout England, Scotland, and Ireland. A member of the Marsden Monthly Meeting, he left to preach in America, arriving in America in May (3mo.) 1709. After a stay of more than nine months, during which he visited Pennsylvania, New England, Maryland, Virginia, and Carolina, he returned to England. There he md., at Yelland, co. Lancaster, England, 28 Nov (9mo.) 1710, Mary Beakbaine, b. 26 Feb (12mo.) 1674/5, Lancaster MM, d. 1754, Chester co., PA, daughter of Thomas Beakbaine and Margaret (Middleton) Beakbaine. [39] Not long afterward, he decided to remove with his family to America, and the Marsden Monthly Meeting, at a meeting held at Trawden, granted him a certificate of removal [40] on 7 1mo. [Mar.] 1713/4, which he presented to the Falls Monthly Meeting, Bucks co., PA on 1 7mo. [Sep.] 1714. [41] He was soon traveling again, visiting Maryland, then Long Island in 1715 and Rhode Island in 1716. In 1720, he fell ill, and two weeks later, on 29 or 30 6mo. [Aug.] 1720, [42] he died. His will, written 21 6mo. [Aug.] 1720, and proved 28 Sep. 1720, mentioned (among others) his wife Mary, his son John, and his brother John. [43] His widow, Mary (Beakbaine) Baldwin md. 2nd 11 Mar (1mo.) 1723/4, Falls MM, Bucks co, PA, Ellis Lewis, of Chester co., PA. [44]

Child of William Baldwin and Mary (Beakbaine) Baldwin:

1. John Baldwin, [45] b. 28 Oct (6mo.) 1712, co. Lancaster, England, d. 1 10mo. [Dec.] 1746, md. Elizabeth Pusey. See C. C. Baldwin, The Baldwin Genealogy (Cleveland, 1881), 761-6, for more information on the descendants of this branch of the family.


Links to transcripts of Supporting Documents

Marriage record of John “Baldwen” and Jennet Hartley, 1697

Certification of John “Baldwen” to have religious meetings in his home, 1700

Marriage record of John “Boldwin” and Ann Scott, 1708

Marriage record of William Baldwin and Mary Beakbaine, 1710

Marriage record of Elizabeth “Baldwen” and James Topper, 1712

Removal certificate of William “Balwin”, 1714

Will of William “Baldwen”, 1720

Wills of Anthony and Margaret “Baldwen”, 1725

Biographical sketches of William and John Baldwin in The Friend


Notes

[1] The precise citations to the relevant sources, with links to transcripts of some of the more important documents, will be given in the genealogical account which appears below after this brief discussion of the parentage of the two brothers.
[2] Before 1752, March was the first month in English records (and in the English colonies in America). Quaker records rarely give the name of the month, and usually give the month by its number. For convenience, conversions to the usual names of the months will be supplied in brackets, and month numbers will be given in the form “12mo.”
[3] In the birth record of his daughter Mary (the first of that name), in the records of the Marsden Monthly Meeting [MM]. These records appear in two different places. One place is in a book of marriages, births, and burials for the Marsden Monthly Meeting, and is on microfilm number 817371 at the Family History Library [FHL]. The same births, marriages, and burials are also recorded in the records of the Lancaster Quarterly Meeting [FHL film number 583995]. These two records will be cited collectively as “Marsden MM records” from this point on, and the individual manuscripts will be cited only if there are important differences between the two.
[4] O. Heywood & T. Dickenson, The Nonconformist Register (Brighouse, 1886), 141.
[5] In the burial record of his daughter Mary (second of the name), in Marsden MM records.
[6] Lancashire Quarter Sessions Petitions, QSP 847-14, Midsummer 1700, on FHL film number 1564516. For a complete transcript, click here .
[7] His probable son John Jr. was already “of Wheatley” at his first marriage in 1697. Modern maps show “Wheatley Lane” and “Laund” as adjacent villages, just west of Nelson in the large parish of Whalley in Lancashire.
[8] Certificate of removal of William Baldwin, on FHL film number 20710. The signatures of John and Briget “Balwin” were the two most prominent names on the certificate, and the certificate refers to William Baldwin's “aged parents whom he leaves alone”. For a transcript of the certificate, click here .
[9] He is “John Baldwen of Wheatley” in the Marsden MM records on FHL film number 817371, and “John Baldwen of Pendle” in the records of the Lancaster Quarterly Meeting on FHL film number 583995.
[10] See the above discussion regarding the identification of John and William as sons of John Sr. Unless otherwise stated, all information for the three daughters comes from the Marsden MM records.
[11] Settle MM records, on FHL film number 588425.
[12] Since his brother William was said in his biography to have been born in Gisburn, co. York, and his father was of Gisburn at the birth of his sister Mary (first of the name), a Yorkshire birth is a reasonable likelihood for John also.
[13] This is a reasonable estimate, based on the date of his first marriage, the known birthdate of his first wife, and his survival until 1757.
[14] New Garden MM, NC records. This death, and all other citations given here for “New Garden MM, NC records”, have been checked against the original records on deposit at Guilford College in Greensboro, NC. These records have been abstracted in William Wade Hinshaw, ed., An Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy , (6 vols., Ann Arbor, 1936-50), vol. 1.
[15] Marsden MM records. For transcripts of the marriage record, click here . There were three Roger Hartleys who were members of the Marsden Monthly Meeting at this time, Jennet's father Roger Sr. of Chamber in Little Marsden, her brother Roger Jr., and Roger Hartley of Oldham, who was married to Jennet's sister Ellen Hartley. Thus, the marriage took place at the house of the bride’s brother-in-law.
[16] Marsden MM records.
[17] The maiden name of Roger Hartley’s wife Alice is proven by the will of Jane “Vipan” of Beardshaw, proved in 1673, which named, among others, her son-in-law Roger Hartley and several grandchildren, including Jennet Hartley [Original will, Consistory Court, Bishop of Chester, on FHL film number 89614]. The name is usually spelled as “Veepon” in the records of the Marsden Monthly Meeting.
[18] Journal of the Friends Historical Society 14 (1917), 43.
[19] Henry “Michel” is listed as one of the passengers of the Britannia who died during or soon after the voyage in a letter from Nicholas Waln of Pennsylvania to William Ellis of Yorkshire. See Jane W. T. Brey, A Quaker Saga , 110-1, for a transcript of this letter, and for more about the voyage of the Britannia.
[20] Robert Brewer wrote his will on 2 Aug 1699 while aboard the Britannia. The will was proved in Philadelphia on 10 Oct 1699, and was abstracted in Publications of the Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania 3 (1906), 30.
[21] Grace Pearson, b. 31 3mo. [May] 1680 [Marsden MM records] was the daughter of Thomas Pearson and Grace (Veepon) Pearson, both of whom died at sea on the Britannia in 1699. The marriage certificate of Thomas Pearson and Grace Veepon [24 Apr [2mo.] 1679, Marsden MM records] was signed by three members of the Hartley family who were explicitly listed as “relatives” (including Jennet's older sister Ellen). Later, on 25 12mo. [Feb.] 1688/9, James Veepon Sr., brother of Grace (Veepon) Pearson, was listed as a relative on the marriage record of Roger Hartley of Oldham and Ellen Hartley [Marsden MM records]. Other than this brief record of his wife, which also indicates his arrival prior to that date, no record of John Baldwin in America has been found prior to his second marriage.
[22] Minutes of the Falls MM, Bucks co., PA [FHL film number 387861]. They declared their intention a second time on 4 12mo. [Feb.] 1707/8.
[23] Falls MM records, on FHL film number 20459. For a transcript of the marriage record, click here .
[24] Lancaster Quarterly Meeting records, on FHL film number 583995.
[25] New Garden MM, NC records.
[26] See Harry Hollingsworth, C.G., “John Scott of the Hill in Yorkshire”, TAG 54 (1978), 19-24, for a good account of the family and ancestry of Ann (Scott) Baldwin.
[27] Falls MM minutes, on FHL film number 387861.
[28] Minutes of the Buckingham Monthly Meeting of Friends, 1720-1734, transcribed by C. Arthur Smith (Bucks County Historical Society, no date), 37.
[29] The suggestion that John and Ann Baldwin followed their son’s migration has been suggested mainly by the appearance of their deaths in the records of the New Garden Monthly Meeting in Guilford co., NC. However, it is clear from examination of the original record at Guilford College, in Greensboro, NC, that these deaths records were made many years later, at the same time that deaths for some of the other members of William Baldwin’s family were being entered. Thus, these retrospective records cannot be regarded as evidence that John and Ann Baldwin ever lived in Virginia or North Carolina.
[30] Births recorded in the records of the Falls Monthly Meeting, in Bucks co., PA, available on FHL film number 20459.
[31] Minutes of the Wrightstown Monthly Meeting of Friends, volume I, 1734-1790, transcribed by C. Arthur Smith (Bucks County Historical Society, 1934), 20.
[32] Rowan co., NC Deed Book 5, pp. 24, 25, 189, 190, as abstracted in Mrs. Stahle Linn, Jr., Abstracts of the Deeds of Rowan county, North Carolina, 1753-1785 (Salisbury, NC, 1983). Another suggested identification for this John Baldwin appears in Frank C. Baldwin, The Baldwins From Virginia Westward (Oak Park, IL, 1985), 85, but no evidence was offered for the identification beyond having the correct name. Given that Phelis/Philis Baldwin appeared in at least one record together with William and Elizabeth Baldwin, the identification suggested here seems more likely.
[33] New Garden MM, NC records.
[34] Minutes of the Wrightstown Monthly Meeting of Friends, volume I, 1734-1790, transcribed by C. Arthur Smith (Bucks County Historical Society, 1934), 42. The destruction of the early Hopewell records makes his time in Virginia difficult to document.
[35] New Garden MM, NC records.
[36] New Garden MM, NC records.
[37] An unsourced birthdate of 1677 for William Baldwin is given in the article [no author listed] “The Travels of William Baldwin in America, 1709”, The Journal of the Friends Historical Society 15 (1918), 27-30 (at p. 27). Except for a brief introduction, the article is a transcript of William Baldwin’s report on his recent travels to the London Yearly Meeting, from the minutes of that meeting.
[38] Unless otherwise stated, information about William Baldwin given here comes from a biographical sketch of him which appeared in The Friend , 28 (1855), 348. For a complete transcript of that sketch, click here .
[39] Records of the Lancaster Monthly Meeting, on FHL film number 584004. For a complete transcript of the marriage record, click here .
[40] Certificate of removal, from the records of the Falls MM, on FHL film number 20710. For a complete transcript of the certificate, click here .
[41] Falls MM minutes, on FHL film number 387861.
[42] The biography in The Friend says the 29th, and the records of the Falls MM say the 30th.
[43] Bucks co., PA Will Book 1, p. 57, on FHL film number 172899. For a complete transcript of the will, click here .
[44] Falls MM records, on FHL film number 20459.
[45] For a transcript of the short biographical sketch of him which appeared in The Friend in 1857, click here .


Last updated 16 June 1999